G9A01:

Which of the following factors determine the characteristic impedance of a parallel conductor antenna feed line?

  1. The distance between the centers of the conductors and the radius of the conductors
  2. The distance between the centers of the conductors and the length of the line
  3. The radius of the conductors and the frequency of the signal
  4. The frequency of the signal and the length of the line

G9A02:

What are the typical characteristic impedances of coaxial cables used for antenna feed lines at amateur stations?

  1. 25 and 30 ohms
  2. 50 and 75 ohms
  3. 80 and 100 ohms
  4. 500 and 750 ohms

G9A03:

What is the typical characteristic impedance of "window line" parallel transmission line?

  1. 50 ohms
  2. 75 ohms
  3. 100 ohms
  4. 450 ohms

G9A04:

What might cause reflected power at the point where a feed line connects to an antenna?

  1. Operating an antenna at its resonant frequency
  2. Using more transmitter power than the antenna can handle
  3. A difference between feed-line impedance and antenna feed-point impedance
  4. Feeding the antenna with unbalanced feed line

G9A05:

How does the attenuation of coaxial cable change as the frequency of the signal it is carrying increases?

  1. Attenuation is independent of frequency
  2. Attenuation increases
  3. Attenuation decreases
  4. Attenuation reaches a maximum at approximately 18 MHz

G9A06:

In what units is RF feed line loss usually expressed?

  1. Ohms per 1000 feet
  2. Decibels per 1000 feet
  3. Ohms per 100 feet
  4. Decibels per 100 feet

G9A07:

What must be done to prevent standing waves on an antenna feed line?

  1. The antenna feed point must be at DC ground potential
  2. The feed line must be cut to a length equal to an odd number of electrical quarter wavelengths
  3. The feed line must be cut to a length equal to an even number of physical half wavelengths
  4. The antenna feed point impedance must be matched to the characteristic impedance of the feed line

G9A08:

If the SWR on an antenna feed line is 5 to 1, and a matching network at the transmitter end of the feed line is adjusted to 1 to 1 SWR, what is the resulting SWR on the feed line?

  1. 1 to 1
  2. 5 to 1
  3. Between 1 to 1 and 5 to 1 depending on the characteristic impedance of the line
  4. Between 1 to 1 and 5 to 1 depending on the reflected power at the transmitter

G9A09:

What standing wave ratio will result when connecting a 50 ohm feed line to a non-reactive load having 200 ohm impedance?

  1. 4:1
  2. 1:4
  3. 2:1
  4. 1:2

G9A10:

What standing wave ratio will result when connecting a 50 ohm feed line to a non-reactive load having 10 ohm impedance?

  1. 2:1
  2. 50:1
  3. 1:5
  4. 5:1

G9A11:

What standing wave ratio will result when connecting a 50 ohm feed line to a non-reactive load having 50 ohm impedance?

  1. 2:1
  2. 1:1
  3. 50:50
  4. 0:0

G9A12:

What is the interaction between high standing wave ratio (SWR) and transmission line loss?

  1. There is no interaction between transmission line loss and SWR
  2. If a transmission line is lossy, high SWR will increase the loss
  3. High SWR makes it difficult to measure transmission line loss
  4. High SWR reduces the relative effect of transmission line loss

G9A13:

What is the effect of transmission line loss on SWR measured at the input to the line?

  1. The higher the transmission line loss, the more the SWR will read artificially low
  2. The higher the transmission line loss, the more the SWR will read artificially high
  3. The higher the transmission line loss, the more accurate the SWR measurement will be
  4. Transmission line loss does not affect the SWR measurement